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DACA: What is the next step?


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In September of 2017, it was announced that the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) would be rescinded and that Congress will decide if DACA will continue or not.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced back in Sept. 2017 that DACA, a policy created by Former President Barack Obama, will end in six months. The Department of Homeland security has also stopped accepting any more applications into the program. 

“I’m here today to announce that the program known as DACA that was effectuated under the Obama administration is being rescinded.” Sessions said.

Although President Donald Trump ended DACA, Congress still has an opportunity to either keep the policy or to repeal it.

DACA allows kids who were brought unknowingly to the US by parents to be able to stay in the US, get a job, go to school, and to college. DACA protects about 800,000 undocumented immigrants . 

“DACA benefits students in many ways, but the greatest benefit may be that it helps undocumented students pursue higher education.” Sarah Feroz, junior, said.

To apply to be a dreamer, one must be under the age of 31 as of June 12, 2012. They would have to have entered the United States of America  before their 16 birthday. They must have resided in the United States since June 15, 2007. To apply one also has to be in school or have graduated from school. One also cannot have any felonies or outstanding misdemeanors.

The possible repeal of DACA may seem like it is an issue far from the Niles North community, but there are students at Niles North that benefit from the policy.

Gustavo Morales, senior and a dreamer, when asked how it feels to know that DACA may end, said, “I feel like it’s just a sense of false hope.”

There are organizations such as the Illinois Coalition for Immigrants and Refugee Rights and the Illinois Dream Fund that help those who need DACA. There are also many resources at Niles North for students.

“Students should know that they can talk about their status with their counselor, with their dean, with any of their teachers, or with Ms. GS in the college resource center.” Pankaj Sharma, teacher, said. 

This may seem like an impossible situation for those in it, but there are resources in the Niles North community and in the communities around us.

 

 

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DACA: What is the next step?