Updates on the Turkey and Syria conflict

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Updates on the Turkey and Syria conflict

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

Photo courtesy of the Hill

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The conflict between Syria and Turkey has risen as on October 23, President Trump lifted all sanctions in Turkey, the ceasefire expired on October 21, as on October 20, 500 USA personnel move through Syria, and the release of Trump’s letter to Turkish President, Tayyip Erdoğan, which was sent on October 9. 

The conflict between the Kurdish, Syria, and Turkey has been going on since 1978. The Kurds are the largest ethnic group in Syria, and have large populations in Turkey, Iraq, and Iran. They are mostly Sunni Muslims, the majority of Muslims are Sunni. There are many reasons why there is a conflict between the Kurdish and Turkey, one reason is that the Kurdish want to be independent from Turkey. The main reason why the US got involved was to weaken ISIS. 

On October 9, Trump sent a letter to Turkish President Erdoğan about the conflict. It was released to the public on October 16. Erdoğan, reportedly, threw the letter in the bin. If you wish to read the letter, click here.

The ceasefire between Syria and Turkey expired on October 21, it was meant to give the Kurdish time to withdraw from the area that they had been self-ruling. 

In more recent news, on October 23 Trump lifted all sanctions in Turkey, and that the ceasefire will be permanent. 

The government of Turkey informed my administration that they would be stopping combat and their offensive in Syria,” Trump said. “And making the ceasefire permanent.”

Since October 20, 500 USA personnel have been moving through Syria. The personnel were reported first gathered at Hasakah, Syria, and en route to the east border. 

Even though this conflict is far away from us, it still affects many of the Niles North students who may be from, or have family in Syria or Turkey.  

“We’re talking about these kids’ homes,” said Aaron Minkus, a Modern World History, ALCUSH, and Honors American History teacher. “And, we’re talking big populations of our students, not only the Assyrian community but the Syrian community in this school that is directly affected by this…This is personal for many people, many kids and staff in this school.”

If you wish to continue following the live updates on the story, click here.